The Social Metwork in 2020

James Fallon – j.fallon@pgr.reading.ac.uk
Brian Lo – brian.lo@pgr.reading.ac.uk 

Hello dear readers! Reviewing submissions and discovering the fascinating research that takes place in Reading Meteorology has been an amazing experience, and a personal highlight of the year!

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to the social metwork this year, and especially to those who have been patient whilst myself and Brian have been getting used to our new roles as co-editors. The quality of submissions has been very high, but don’t let that deter you if you haven’t written for the blog before! Writing for the social metwork is not as tricky as you might think – we promise!

At the time of writing, the blog has had over 5550 visitors, and is on track for an all time high by the end of the year. We hope that the social metwork has contributed to lifting spirits and continuing the met department social atmosphere throughout the year. In case you missed any posts, or want a second look at some, here is a list of all the posts from this year:

January
North American weather regimes and the stratospheric polar vortex – Simon Lee
Evaluating ocean eddies in coupled climate simulations on a global scale – Sophia Moreton
The (real) butterfly effect: the impact of resolving the mesoscale range – Tsz Yan Leung

February
Life on Industrial Placement – Holly Turner
An inter-comparison of Arctic synoptic scale storms between four global reanalysis datasets – Alec Vessey
A new, explicit thunderstorm electrification scheme for the Met Office Unified Model – Ben Courtier

March
Relationships in errors between meteorological forecasts and air quality forecasts – Kaja Milczewska
Tips for working from home as a PhD student – Simon Lee

May
Air pollution and COVID-19: is ozone an undercover criminal? – Kaja Milczewska
The philosophy of climate science – Mark Prosser
Explaining complicated things with simple words: Simple writer challenge – Linda Toča

June
Methane’s Shortwave Radiative Forcing – Rachael Byrom

July
How do ocean and atmospheric heat transports affect sea-ice extent? – Jake Aylmer

August
A Journey through Hot British Summers – Simon Lee
Exploring the impact of variable floe size on the Arctic sea ice – Adam Bateson

September
How Important are Post-Tropical Cyclones to European Windstorm Risk? – Elliott Sainsbury
The Scandinavia-Greenland Pattern: something to look out for this winter – Simon Lee

October
My journey to Reading: Going from application to newly minted SCENARIO PhD student – George Gunn
The visual complexity of coronal mass ejections follows the solar cycle – Shannon Jones
Organising a virtual conference – Gwyneth Matthews
Visiting Scientist Week Preview: Laure Zanna – Kaja Milczewska

November
Demonstrating as a PhD student in unprecedented times – Brian Lo
ECMWF/EUMETSAT NWP SAF Workshop on the treatment of random and systematic errors in satellite data assimilation for NWP – Devon Francis
Extra conference funding: how to apply and where to look – Shannon Jones
Youth voices pick up the slack: MOCK COP 26 – James Fallon

Enjoy the panto, have a very merry Christmas, and here’s to 2021!
From your metwork co-editors James & Brian!

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