Air-sea heat fluxes at the oceanic mesoscale: the impact of the ratio of ocean-to-atmosphere grid resolution

Sophia Moreton – s.moreton@pgr.reading.ac.uk

Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies are vital for regulating the earth’s weather and climate.  The generation and reduction of these SST anomalies are largely determined by air-sea heat fluxes, particularly turbulent heat fluxes (latent and sensible).

The turbulent heat flux feedback (THFF) is a critical parameter, which measures the change in the net air-sea turbulent heat flux in response to a 1 K change in SST. So far in current research, this feedback is well known at large scales, i.e. over the whole ocean basin. However, a quantification of this feedback at much smaller spatial scales (10-100km) over individual mesoscale ocean eddies remains absent.

Why do we care about air-sea feedbacks at the oceanic mesoscale?

Both heat and momentum air-sea exchanges at the mesoscale impact the local and large-scale atmosphere (e.g. shifting storm tracks) and alter the strength of western boundary currents and the large-scale ocean gyre circulation. However, research into this field to date is hindered by the lack of high spatial resolution in observational data at the air-sea interface.

Therefore our study uses three high-resolution configurations from the UK Met Office coupled climate model (HadGEM3-GC3). We provide the first global estimate of turbulent heat flux feedback (α) over individually tracked and composite-averaged coherent mesoscale eddies, which ranges between 35 to 45 Wm-2K-1 depending on eddy amplitude.

Estimates of the turbulent heat flux feedback (THFF) are split, depending if the feedback is calculated using SST on the ocean grid (α0) or after regridding SST to the atmosphere (αA). An example of αA using regridded SST anomalies (SSTA) is given in Fig.1 for large-amplitude eddies in the highest ocean-atmosphere resolution available (a 25km atmosphere coupled to a 1/12° ocean, labelled ‘N512-12’).

Figure 1: A scatter plot of the relationship (THFF, αA) between regridded SST (SSTA) and THF anomalies. αA is the gradient of the linear regression line (black) +/- the 95% confidence interval (shown by the text). The data is from eddy snapshots averaged over 1 year, denoted by ‘< >’. Only large-amplitude eddies in the N512-12 configuration (25km atmosphere – 1/12° ocean) are plotted.

Why is the feedback so sensitive to the ratio of grid resolution?

In high-resolution coupled climate models, the atmospheric resolution is typically coarser than in its ocean component although, to date, a quantification of what the ocean-atmosphere ratio of grid resolution should be remains absent.

We prove increasing the ratio of atmosphere-to-ocean grid resolution in coupled climate models can lead to a large underestimation of turbulent heat flux feedback over mesoscale eddies, by as much as 75% for a 6:1 resolution ratio, as circled in Fig. 2 from a 60km atmosphere coupled to a 1/12° ocean. An underestimation of the feedback is consistent across all eddy amplitudes (A) and all three model configurations shown (Fig. 2); it suggests SST anomalies within these eddies are likely to be not reduced enough by air-sea fluxes of heat, and consequently will remain too large.

The underestimation stems from the calculation of the air-sea heat fluxes in the HadGEM3-GC3.1 model on the coarser atmospheric grid, instead of the finer ocean grid. Many other climate models do the same. At present, for the long spin-ups needed for climate simulations, it is unrealistic to expect the atmospheric resolution to match the very fine (10km) ocean resolution in coupled climate models, i.e. to create a one-to-one grid ratio. Therefore, to minimise this underestimation in the feedback at mesoscales, we advise air-sea heat fluxes should be computed on the finer oceanic grid.

Figure 2: Estimates of the turbulent heat flux feedback (THFF) across different eddy amplitudes (A) for α0 (lighter colours) and αA (darker colours, using regridded SST) for three model configurations: N512-12, N216-12 and N216-025. The ocean and atmosphere resolutions are added in red for each. Increasing the ratio of grid resolution, underestimates the THFF (as α0 differs from αA). The horizontal bars indicate the width of the eddy amplitude bins, and the vertical error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals.

Correctly simulating the air-sea heat flux feedback over mesoscale eddies is fundamental to realistically represent their interaction with the local and large-scale atmosphere and feedback on the ocean, to improve our predictions of the earth’s climate.

For a full analysis of the results, including a decomposition of the turbulent heat flux feedback, the reader is referred to Moreton et al., 2021, Air-Sea Turbulent Heat Flux Feedback over Mesoscale Eddies, GRL (in review).

Manuscript available: https://doi.org/10.1002/essoar.10505981.1

This work lays the foundation for my current work, evaluating how mesoscale air-sea heat fluxes feedback and alter the strength of large-scale ocean gyre circulation, using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm).

This work is funded by a NERC CASE studentship with the Met Office, UK.

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